• Matt Iselin

Making the Most of Revisions

Mix revisions don't have to be frustrating, scary or a long ordeal for everyone involved. Here are a few tips to make the revision process seamless.


The First Round

The first round of mix revisions happens after you receive the initial mix from your engineer. This mix has the engineer's sonic fingerprints all over it and is heavily based on your reference tracks and rough mix if one was provided. It's almost certain that you will find something you want to fix in the mix. That's to be expected, which is why every mix Pretty Good Audio completes comes with at least two sets of revisions included in the rate.


The easiest way to think about this process is to look at it as putting your fingerprints on the mix and fine-tuning it into the perfect mix for you to publish to the world.


Rounds 2 & 3

These are included in your rate already. You're welcome to use them all if you wish, or if you love what you're hearing earlier you can leave them alone.


Mix Notes

Great mix notes don't just save us time. Great mix notes also get you the mix you want faster and with fewer questions.


The best mix notes:

  • include timestamps,

  • clearly articulate what is undesirable

  • don't contradict other notes

For example, "the vocal effect at 0:43 clashes too much with the synthesizer playing the lead line" would let us get you a fixed mix faster than "right before the pre-chorus, the vocals are too loud".


It's worth spending some time building your mix notes to send. There's no limit on the notes per revision - just on the number of revisions.


Listen in your car, on your favorite headphones, in your home studio - wherever you listen to music - and send through your notes to get your mix sounding perfect to you.


Just One Voice

Everyone in the band has an opinion about the mixes, but rather than send through notes for each band member, come to an agreement with your band and send a single set of notes.


It'll save you time by sending through mix notes that don't have unintended contradictions, and it'll get your whole band on the same page before you run out of included revisions in the project.


Summary

Check out this infographic summarizing our tips for mix revisions so you're always getting the best results, waiting less, and publishing great-sounding music.

Questions? Hit us up in the comments, on Facebook, or on Instagram!

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